Microneedling

Microneedling is a method used to treat different skin conditions. The technique involves using multiple tiny, sterile needles to puncture the skin and cause physical trauma. This trauma is a the dermal layer which promotes collagen production. Aging causes lower levels of collagen to be produced contributing to wrinkles and other signs of aging. Microneedling helps address many skin related problems including wrinkles; scarring; acne; alopecia; stretch marks; rosacea; and skin pigmentation issues.

Microneedling can depost medication and powerful serums such as Vitamin C, hyaluronic acid, and tretinoin into the dermis. Although microneedling is considered to be safe and effective there are some risks. These include swelling; discomfort at the site; redness; dryness and flaking of the skin.

It is important to realize that microneedling is not a quick fix, as it involves the growth of new skin. It can take several months for a person for see the full results of treatment.


Everything You Need to Know About Microneedling

Microneedling may sound like an intimidating procedure, no thanks to the word "needle" in its name, but the treatment can be considered a more effective way to do a facial—aside from the numbing cream involved. "You're really building collagen and thickening the skin, so instead of looking good for a few days after your traditional facial, your skin is smooth and radiant for much longer," explains Beverly Hills-based plastic surgeon Dr. Sheila Nazarian. "It's such a safe procedure, and is great for filling in acne scars." Of course, the idea of getting needles inserted into your face for the sake of skincare can seem intimidating, but if you've seen the before and after shots, there's no questioning the treatment's effectiveness, and instead of using injectable fillers to repair an indented area, the process kick-starts your body's own natural collagen production to heal the skin on its own. We asked Dr. Nazarian for a crash course on the treatment, so you can determine whether or not it's right for you.

What Is It?

Miicroneedling is a treatment that involves using a tool with 9 super-tiny needles in the very tip, which can be adjusted by your professional between 0.5 and 2.5 millimeters. "0.5 millimeters is the smallest amount, which penetrates the stratum cornea, or the superficial layer of skin," Nazarian tells us. "You can think of microneedling as collagen induction—or collagen induction therapy, which is another name for it—and the treatment creates micro-punctures from the needles inyour skin. Your body treats a small wound the same way as a large wound, and sends fibroblasts to create more collagen in the affected area. We are basically tricking your skin into thinking it has been wounded, but as a result, we're thickening the skin and improving the texture with this procedure." It is a great alternative for those who are searching for more than a facial but not yet ready for laser treatment.

Who Should Do It?

If you need to grow a thicker skin you're probably a good candidate. "It's great for acne scarring, and because it doesn't use heat and is totally mechanical, it's safe for all skin colors and types," Nazarian says. "The treatment is wonderful for smoothing out the skin and filling in acne scars, but if you have those small bumps from clogged pores, it can help to clear all of that up as well." Just make sure there aren't any inflamed or infected areas on your skin, and if you have a cystic breakout, wait until it clears up before going in for your appointment. It addresses many facial issues such as fine lines and wrinkles; lifts sagging cheeks; tightens enlarged pores and smooths acne scarring.

Does It Hurt?

It shouldn't, provided that your practitioner numbs the area first. "We use a cream to numb the skin really well, so we can go as deep as we need to," she says. Afterwards you can expect the skin to be a little pink, and at the very worst, a few tiny punctate scabs that fade in a few days.

Which Areas on the Body Can Be Treated?

Microneedling isn't exclusive to just the face area. The treatment can be done anywhere the skin on the body needs to be thickened, particularly those that have stretch marks, like the legs, chest, or butt, and 4 to 6 sessions on average usually do the trick.

How Often Can I Get It Done?

Depends on the severity of the issue. "If your skin is generally fine and you take care of it, you can microneedle every 3 to 6 months, but someone with dramatic acne scarring should plan to do one session per month for 4 to 6 months," Nazarian explains. "After that, you can come in once a year for a touch-up whenever you feel like you need to give your skin a reboot."

What Should I Do Afterwards?

Ideally, you'll want to avoid putting on makeup for the rest of the day, but if you have prior commitments, it's totally safe to wear later in the night. You should avoid retinol products for the next few days and avoid strenuous activity for 48 hours. Sun exposure should be avoided for one week. You will need to wash your face 1-2x/day after the first day. You can use your regular moisturizer 1-2x/day.


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(picture courtesy of skin secrets)

PRICING

FACIAL MICRONEEDLING: $199.00/treatment

NECK MICRONEEDLING: $75.00/treatment

CHEST MICRONEEDLING: $199.00/treatment


What is microneedling? Benefits and use:

Microneedling is a method that some dermatologists use to treat different skin conditions. The technique involves using multiple tiny, sterile needles to puncture the skin and cause physical trauma.

This trauma prompts the derma, a deeper layer of skin, to rebuild.

Microneedling may help address many skin-related complaints, including:

  • wrinkles

  • scarring

  • acne

  • alopecia

  • skin pigmentation issues

  • stretch marks

  • rosacea

  • loose skin, such as after weight loss or liposuction

It may also help rejuvenate the skin.

In addition, professionals can use microneedling to deposit medication, such as topical tretinoin or vitamin C, deeper into the skin. This can boost the treatment of a variety of issues, including acne scarring.

Read on to learn more about microneedling, how it works, and whether there are any risks.

How does microneedling work?

Mirconeedling may help address wrinkles, acne, scarring, and stretch marks. 

Microneedling increases the production of collagen and other healing factors by causing trauma to the skin.

Collagen is an essential protein that helps keep the skin looking youthful, with a firm, smooth, and stretchy texture.

Aging causes the decline of collagen in the skin, contributing to wrinkles and other signs of aging.

Skin can also lose collagen due to injuries, such as acne scarring, stretch marks, or other scars.

It is important to realize that microneedling is not a quick fix, as it involves the growth of new skin. It can take several months for a person to see the full results of the procedure.

What are the benefits?

2018 systematic review found that microneedling is a safe and effective way to rejuvenate skin and treat scars and wrinkles.

The researchers acknowledged, however, that determining whether microneedling is a viable treatment option in all cases will require further research.

A press release from the American Academy of Dermatology also states that people can expect a reduction in the "appearance of large pores, fine lines and wrinkles, scars, and stretch marks."

What are the risks?

The medical community generally considers microneedling to be safe and effective, but there are still some risks.

The primary risk is skin irritation after the procedure. Other side effects could include:

  • swelling

  • discomfort at the site

  • redness

  • bruising

  • dryness

  • flaking of the skin

Bleeding is an uncommon reaction to microneedling, though it may be more likely to occur after a deeper treatment.

Bleeding may also be more of a risk for people who have bleeding disorders or who are taking blood-thinning medications. It is important to disclose this information to a doctor before receiving this treatment.

There is also a risk of more serious side effects, including:

  • infection

  • skin pigment changes

  • reaction to topical medications used during treatment

Some devices involve additional risks. Those that use energy or heat can increase the likelihood of burns.

Finally, some people are not candidates for microneedling treatment, including those with:

  • an active skin infection

  • active acne

  • keloid scarring

  • an unstable skin type

Seeing a dermatologist or medical skin care professional who is experienced in these types of procedures will help minimize the risks.